Books in the Park

suggestions from the Barbara S. Ponce Public Library at Pinellas Park


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Raven Pirate Princess: Captain Raven and the All-Girl Pirate Crew, by Jeremy Whitley

Raven Pirate Princess: Captain Raven and the All-Girl Pirate Crew, by Jeremy Whitley and illustrated by Rosy Higgins and Ted Brandt

Take one pirate princess without a crew or a ship, add a heaping scoop of determination, and round it off with a band of misfits that come together under her colors and you have Raven Pirate Princess: Captain Raven and the All-Girl Pirate Crew, by Jeremy Whitley and illustrated by Rosy Higgins and Ted Brandt. I expected action and adventure, but what kept me hooked was the witty humor and lovable characters.

Having previously been abandoned to a tower by herself to wait for her prince, Raven now faces an onslaught of the stereotypical male pirates as she begins her search for a crew. She hears everything from “not all men,” to “Help! I’m being oppressed by the matriarchy!” as she turns down man after man for the job. The crew comes together from women around town who are looking for new adventures. They’ve slayed the Goblin Kings in their table top games, now it’s time to band together and go search for real danger. Led by the new first mate, Katie (a.k.a. Muscles), a diverse crew of women rallies behind Raven to set out to reclaim her rightful place as the head of her family’s pirate enterprise.

The art in Raven Pirate Princess: Captain Raven and the All-Girl Pirate Crew was stunning – the scenes are all well drawn and dynamic and the story flowed easily from one panel to the next. Beyond the writing and artistic skill used to portray the women, I truly appreciated the diversity that is included among the crew. Yes, it is an all women crew, but you will not confuse one woman for another. They each have their own unique looks, backgrounds, interests, and dialogue style. Any Pirate Princess can pick up this graphic novel and see herself in its pages. This graphic novel is recommended for ages 9+ and is a quick, fun read for any girl (or their mom!) that’s ever dreamed of the sailing the seven seas.

Check the PPLC Catalog for Raven Pirate Princess: Captain Raven and the All-Girl Pirate Crew, by Jeremy Whitley. 


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Muslims and the Making of America by Amir Hussain

Did you know that eighty years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock, there was a Muslim slave exploring what is now Southwest America alongside the conquistadors? Did you know that Thomas Jefferson owned a Qur’an? Did you know that without the help of American Muslims, Ray Charles may never have been famous? These and many other amazing facts are revealed in Amir Hussain’s short book, Muslims and the Making of America. 

The author admits that this book is a broad introduction to the history of American Muslims, but it is full to bursting with facts. Hussain shows that Muslims worldwide, are not a homogeneous stereotype. The religion crosses races, ages, countries, genders, and pay grade. We also get a history lesson; Hussain details how Muslim individuals, and communities have shaped music, medicine, architecture, and sports throughout our country’s lifetime. With this book, Hussain sets out to demonstrate that Islam is more American than apple pie, and he does so eloquently. Muslims and the Making of America clearly shows that without Muslims, America wouldn’t be what it is today.


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Geekerella, by Ashley Poston

This is a modern day retelling of – you guessed it – Cinderella. The classic fairytale about an orphaned girl who is left with her Wicked Stepmother and stepsisters after the death of her father. The stepsisters relentlessly taunt her and make her life difficult, while the stepmother treats her as a servant instead of as a daughter.

Geekerella is no different, except that in modern day Charleston there are no princes to woo. Danielle – Elle, for short – has grown up as a megafan of the series Starfield and the announcement has just been made that a reboot is coming. Normally, this wouldn’t involve anyone from her family, as they all look down on her “fandom,” however, it is revealed that teen heartthrob Darien Freeman will be playing the lead role. Elle’s Darien obsessed step-sisters decide to enter the cosplay contest that has been announced for a chance to win a meet-and-greet with the actor, as well as a trip to the premiere of Starfield in Los Angeles.

On the other side of the story, Prince Carmindor himself, Darrien, finds himself as young Hollywood royalty but lacks the normal life of an eighteen year old that he longs for. He doesn’t want to attend the convention as a celebrity, missing the days when he was able to go as a fan. He’s talented, good looking, and rich, but he is terribly lonely.

Meanwhile, Elle gets a text from a Prince Carmindor cosplayer who would like to cancel his appearance at Excelsicon, the convention where the contest will be held. Elle and the stranger text daily. It is clear that they are both true fans of the show and this is the first time since her father’s death that she’s been able to connect with someone over it the series. Elle decides to enter the contest as well, figuring that she can make a run for it and stay in L.A. if she wins and finally be rid of her stepfamily. With the help of a fairy co-worker named Sage and the Magic Pumpkin (a vegan food truck), Elle is Atlanta-bound for the convention and hopes to meet her Prince Carmindor in person.

The story is derivative and predictable, but that doesn’t make it any less fun. It was a quick and satisfying read that left me with a smile on my face, as most happy endings do.

Check the PPLC Catalog for Geekerella, by Ashley Poston.


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September 2017 Book Group Selections

Evening Book Club

Wednesday
September 13, 2017
6:30 p.m.

Dance of the Reptiles by Carl Hiaasen

Description from the publisher: collects the best of Hiaasen’s Miami Herald columns, which lay bare the stories—large and small—that demonstrate anew that truth is far stranger than fiction. Hiaasen offers his commentary—indignant, disbelieving, sometimes righteously angry, and frequently hilarious—on burning issues like animal welfare, polluted rivers, and the broken criminal justice system as well as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Bernie Madoff’s trial, and the shenanigans of the recent presidential elections. Whether or not you have read Carl Hiaasen before, you are in for a wild ride.

Afternoon Book Club

Thursday
September 21, 2017
2:00 p.m.

The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George

Description from the publisher: Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can’t seem to heal through literature is himself; he’s still haunted by heartbreak after his great love disappeared. She left him with only a letter, which he has never opened.


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Assassin’s Creed (2016)

Assassin’s Creed, for those unfamiliar, takes the player into the past to relive the memories locked within their DNA and passed down from their ancestors. For the first several games you travel into this world with the help of Desmond Miles, a modern day assassin with genetic ties to many important figures within the history of the Assassin’s Brotherhood. He is being forced to relive these memories by Abstergo, a mega conglomerate that is a front for the Knights Templar.

You don’t need to know that to watch Assassin’s Creed. We pick up with a brand new protagonist: Calum “Cal” Lynch, played by Michael Fassbender. Little is shared about Cal’s backstory outside of the events that start off the film. He’s not necessarily a likable character, being on death row when we first meet him, but you quickly begin to wonder about his past and be a bit concerned for him as he is brought in by Abstergo to help them test their Animus project and delve into the history of his own ancestor, Aguilar de Nerha.

It’s at this point that the story really picks up the pace. Cal is placed into the Animus and his ancestor’s memories play before him. He must keep up with Aguilar and not stray from the path that he took. Doing so would risk desynchronization, which could lead to ejection from the Animus, insanity, or even death.

Aguilar lived in 15th Century Spain, during the time of the Spanish Inquisition. We see him and the other members of the Assassin’s Brotherhood fighting against troops led by Torquemada – a member of the Templar Order, of course – to keep an item of great power out of their hands.

While the present day story line is interesting, the historical aspect is what screams Assassin’s Creed about this film. Watching Fassbender (who also plays Aguilar) running through the streets of Seville in 1491 to escape Torquemada’s men is fast paced, heart pounding action that could keep nearly anyone entertained. The series has always been known for their use of Parkour or Free running, which is predominantly displayed through the ancient city.

Overall, as an Assassin’s Creed mega fan with high expectations, I was entertained and enjoyed the film. There were enough differences from the games that it felt like something that was new and it’s own instead of a game sequel. Was it the best movie of 2016? No. Will I re-watch it anyway? Absolutely, and for that reason I will gladly recommend it to anyone looking for a fun movie.


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Ada Twist, Scientist, by Andrea Beatty

Ada Twist, Scientist, by Andrea Beaty

There’s no denying that we need more S.T.E.M. books geared towards children. Andrea Beaty is working towards that goal with her hit picture books about Iggy Peck, Architect, Rosie Revere, Engineer, and now Ada Twist, Scientist. Ada Twist, Scientist is the latest of these books and was chosen as one of the Sunshine State Young Readers Award Jr. books for the 2017-2018 school year.

Beaty has once again paired with David Roberts as the illustrator and the book is adorable! The book, as with the first two, is written in rhyme which makes it really fun to read out loud with younger readers.

Ada is an intriguing character, as it is explained that she is mostly silent until the age of three, at which time she starts asking “why?” Not satisfied with “I don’t know,” young Ada turns to the scientific method to help learn about all of the world’s wondrous (and not sometimes stinky) things. The book follows Ada as she develops her scientific and sometimes troublesome nature. Ada’s family loves to help with her experiments, but sometimes they become troublesome around the house!

I have read this book to my 3 and 6 year old daughters countless times and recommend it to many of our younger readers at the library. It is recommended for grades K-2, but will be fun even for older children. Young scientists will love this book and their parents will surely love the ideas that start popping into their heads when they too discover that they don’t have to just ask “why” and can discover the world of science for themselves.

Check the PPLC catalog for Ada Twist, Scientist.


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Hamilton (Original Broadway Cast Recording), by Lin Manuel Miranda

Hamilton (Original Broadway Cast Recording), by Lin Manuel Miranda

Few musicals have taken off in popularity the way that Hamilton has. The hit show about founding father Alexander Hamilton has been going strong on Broadway for two years and the original cast recording has gone platinum twice.

The story begins with a narration by Aaron Burr, played here by Leslie Odom, Jr., who describes himself at the end of the first song as “the damn fool that shot him.” The introduction, Alexander Hamilton, tells the story of Hamilton’s tragic upbringing and his immigration to the United States, setting up his involvement with the American Revolution.

The themes of friendship, revolution, toil, and arrogance ring throughout the musical. Ambitious as can be – Miranda described the titular character as a Slytherin when asked about his Hogwarts house – Hamilton is quick to make influential friends, including Aaron Burr, the Marquis de Lafayette, and George Washington. Burr, as most likely remember, was later Vice President of the United States – the post that he held when he and Hamilton dueled in 1804.

I will say that I am not much of a hip hop fan. This was one of my first forays into the genre, and it was a good introduction, indeed! Miranda’s writing combined with music by Alex Lacamoire is catchy, witty, and holds the attention of five and fifty year olds, alike (However, while my children enjoy the clean version of the soundtrack, it’s not something that I’d recommend for all children!).

Check the PPLC catalog for Hamilton (Original Broadway Cast Recording).