Books in the Park

suggestions from the Barbara S. Ponce Public Library at Pinellas Park


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The Iron Druid Chronicles, by Kevin Hearne

hounded-iron-druid-hearneI love books written in series because they give you a chance to really get to know the characters and to delve deeply into the world they inhabit. I recently ran across Hounded, the first title in Kevin Hearne’s The Iron Druid Chronicles, and proceeded to binge-read every title in the series. The series does all I ask for with well-crafted plotlines, good world-building, and memorable characters that you root for, including a magically enhanced Irish wolfhound. Plus, there is mythology—lots of it.

Atticus O’Sullivan (his actual Gaelic name looks terrifying to pronounce, but is included in a handy pronunciation guide) is the last druid alive and is at least 2000 years old. Before the Romans exterminated all the Druids left in Ireland, Britain, and Gaul, he escaped in order to be able to fulfill his destiny, to protect Gaia. He now lives in Tempe, Arizona, and takes care of the lands around there while avoiding the attentions of the gods.

Gods? Yes, gods. Hearne’s world-building is masterful, blending all the pantheons in a multiverse sort of way, with the Irish gods, Norse gods, and Greco-Roman gods featuring prominently in the stories. There are also witches, vampires, and werewolves. As Atticus is Irish, most of his dealings are with the Tuatha de Danann, the Irish pantheon of deities. He is under Morrigan’s protection, and as such, is a pawn in their pantheon’s plots and machinations. As gods do, they act through other, less deific agents on earth, and so the first few books deal with the magical inhabitants of the Tempe area. Later adventures involve many other pantheons, including even Ganesh the elephant-headed Hindu god.

Atticus has friends, especially his Irish wolfhound, Oberon. Oberon is magically enhanced and carries on hilarious telepathic conversations with Atticus from a dog’s worldview. Atticus’ legal affairs are taken care of by, of course, a vampire and werewolf. As the series progresses, he adds an apprentice, Granuaile (pronounced gran ya wail, if you want to know) whose decade-long training is interrupted with adventures through seven books.

The stories are full of humor, adventure, and the occasional throwdown between gods and mortals. The books’ events follow in sequence, so they really need to be read in order. Atticus is both brash and human, despite his advanced age. His good intentions occasionally go awry, but they make him likable.  The mixing of the various pantheons allows for magic, science, and deific powers to coexist seamlessly, and even with some broad humor. I enjoyed the series thoroughly and look forward to more of Atticus and Granuaile’s adventures.

Check the PPLC Catalog for:

Book 1: Hounded
Book 2: Hexed
Book 3: Hammered
Book 4: Tricked
Book 5: Trapped
Book 6: Hunted
Book 7: Shattered
Book 8: Staked


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Gotham Academy, by Becky Cloonan, Brenden Fletcher, Karl Kerschl

gotham-academy-cloonanOlive Silverlock attends Gotham Academy, the most prestigious boarding school in Gotham, and she is troubled. Not only is Olive’s mom locked up in Arkham Asylum for unknown reasons, but Olive is also haunted by hazy memories of a mysterious incident that happened over summer break. Closing herself off, Olive attempts to avoid Kyle Mizoguchi, her tennis player boyfriend who has the good looks of a K-Pop star. Unfortunately, she is forced to show his freshman sister, Maps, around campus. Add to these problems the innate secrets of Gotham Academy itself: the hidden passageways, the ghost haunting the campus, and the secret society running around, Olive is in for an interesting school year.

There is so much to love about Gotham Academy! It’s been described as Harry Potter meets Batman, and it doesn’t disappoint. Harry Potter fans will appreciate the mystery solving, allusions to magic, and the boarding school dynamics. Batman fans will appreciate the many Easter eggs and guest stars. Bruce Wayne gives a speech at the Academy and he swings onto the scene a couple of times as his alter ego, Batman. There are other familiar elements tossed into Olive’s experience too like a reference to the Langstrom virus and a surprisingly fun appearance by Killer Croc. For Batman fans, it’s fun to see Gotham from the perspective of new characters. It gives an already familiar setting more depth.

None of this, however, takes away from Olive’s story. Perhaps the best part of all is how even readers who know nothing about the Bat-Mythos will still enjoy this book. Olive’s story skillfully intertwines these elements, but they aren’t the point of her story. Readers who aren’t interested in typical superhero comics or who don’t know much about Batman needn’t shy away from Gotham Academy. The new stories and characters it offers definitely stand up on their own. One of the most delightful of these new creations is the character Maps. She’s got the spunky but steadfast sidekick thing down pat. But, she’s a great character in her own right. Her enthusiasm for the D&D-like game, Serpents & Spells, and her love of cartography (which gives her the nickname Maps) is fun, cool, and adorable.

Overall, readers of all ages will find Gotham Academy enjoyable. It’s got great art, smart storytelling, a diverse cast, and a bunch of mysteries that need unraveling. Also, don’t miss the crossover Gotham Academy is currently doing with the comic book Lumberjanes. Read about it here.

Check the PPLC Catalog for Gotham Academy.


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The Wild Robot, by Peter Brown

wild-robot-brownWhen Roz the robot is shipwrecked on a tiny island, she has only her basic programming to guide her. Roz is not built for the outdoors, but she is designed to be adaptable, thoughtful, and intelligent, and she soon realizes that her best hope for survival is to learn and gain support from the island’s hostile animal inhabitants. Gaining the animal’s trust takes time and it’s only when she tries to care for an orphaned gosling that the other animals finally decide to help her. The island starts to feel like home to Roz until one day, the robot’s mysterious past comes back to haunt her.

The Wild Robot is author and illustrator Peter Brown’s first novel. Brown, known for his children’s picture books, such as Children Make Terrible Pets, has totally succeeded in producing an utterly charming first novel. Though The Wild Robot starts off slow, once Roz learns the language of the animals, the story flourishes. The animals of the island all have big personalities and Roz begins to form friendships with them, like with Chitchat the squirrel and Loudwing the goose. Roz solicits their help to care for the gosling Brightbill who she becomes a mother to. Roz and Brightbill eventually become invaluable members of the island community. Roz even helps the animals survive through a grueling winter by teaching them to make fire.

This book has been compared to Hatchet and My Side of the Mountain. Readers who enjoy these types of survivalist stories will definitely be drawn into Roz’s tale. It could also be compared to Stuart Little. Both are stories about extraordinary protagonists who don’t quite belong and through adventure and perseverance make a life for themselves. Lovers of these types of stories as well as both robot and animal lovers will find something to delight in here. For adult readers, The Wild Robot makes a great parenting story and the philosophical questions that naturally arise between robot Roz and living animal Brightbill can be in turns both fun and thoughtful. With such a wide appeal, Brown’s book can also be enjoyed together as a read aloud for younger children. No one should miss out on this sparkling book!

Check the PPLC Catalog for The Wild Robot.


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Star Wars: Before the Awakening, by Greg Rucka

before-awakening-ruckaHave you caught Star Wars fever? Well then now is a great time to explore the new expanded universe with one of the first additions in the book series. Star Wars: Before the Awakening takes us into the lives of Stormtrooper FN-2187 (later called Finn), scavenger Rey, and Resistance pilot Poe Dameron before the events of Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens. This story is available exclusively to readers.

The book is broken up into three parts and has amazing illustrations of the main characters. It begins with FN-2187, who has received top marks in all of his training as a Stormtrooper, and introduces some of his comrades.

Next, travel to Jakku to learn more about the mysterious scavenger, Rey. She was deserted on the desert planet at a very young age and needed to learn to fend for herself. She finds ship parts and trades them for food and even builds herself a computer with a simulation program to learn how to fly spaceships.

The last character that we are introduced to is Poe, the best pilot in the New Republic Navy. Poe tells his commanders what a threat the First Order presents, but they dismiss his fears. Seeing what Poe is up to, General (formerly Princess) Leia Organa recruits him to fight for the resistance.

I would recommend this book for readers in middle or high school. It was definitely an entertaining read and it was nice to learn more about the new characters. Happy reading and may the Force be with you!

Check the PPLC Catalog for Star Wars: Before the Awakening.


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The Raven Cycle series, by Maggie Stiefvater

raven-boys-stiefvaterA family of psychics, a prophecy of death to a first true love, a boy who once cheated certain demise, an ancient legendary king who will grant one wish to the one who discovers him, rolling Virginia hills, mysterious ancient magic that lives in forests—you had me at hello.

Enter Blue Sargent, a seemingly typical teenage girl who is trying to get through school, works a part time job at a local pizza joint, and wants to move out of her small town in Virginia once she graduates. Seems normal, right? Wrong. Blue belongs to a family of psychics who perform all manner of fortune telling, tarot card reading, phone psychic hot line, bowl scrying, talk to the trees type stuff. Except, Blue seems to be the only member of the family who does not possess the gift. She is a major player in the family business, however, due to her ability to amplify their psychic powers.

The story begins on St. Mark’s Eve, where Blue sits at midnight in a church with her aunt, Neeve. Blue’s duty is to write down the names of all souls who pass into the church—souls that will perish in the coming year. Blue, of course, cannot see these souls. However, this St. Mark’s Eve proves to be different than from those in the past. One soul she is able to see. A teenage boy, wearing the sweater of the local all-boys private academy, Aglionby, drenched and whose name, he tells her, is Gansey. Blue seems struck at how close this boy feels to her and wonders why she is able to see this ghost when she cannot see any other. Neeve simply replies, “There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve, Blue. Either you’re his true love, or you killed him.”

And so begins the story of Blue Sargent joining Richard Gancey, Adam Parrish, Ronan Lynch, and Noah Czerny on a quest to find the ancient sleeping Welsh king, Glendower, who is rumored to be slumbering in the mountains of Virginia. The readers know from the get-go that Gansey faces impending doom and we read the story because, like Blue, we are railing against it. Along the way we discover hidden magical realms, remarkable talents that have been kept secret from the closest of friends, and characters that should not be walking on this Earth but seem to find a way. Fans of urban fantasy should sink their teeth into this juicy steak of a series.

Unfortunately, I had to wait for the release of each book with bated breath—The Raven Boys; The Dream Thieves; Blue Lily, Lily Blue; and The Raven King. But you, oh lucky reader, can devour this entire series as fast as your little eyes will allow. Enjoy it! It truly is one of the very best teen series I have read, and I’ve read so, so many.

Check the PPLC Catalog for The Raven Cycle series.


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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, by John Tiffany, Jack Thorne, and J.K. Rowling

cursed child thorneFirst off, I’m a huge Harry Potter nerd. When I hear those first few musical notes at the beginning of each movie, I get goosebumps. I read my first Harry Potter book when I was 10, and 17 years later I’m still obsessed. Having said that, I was not at all excited for this new installment. I had come to terms with the end of Harry and was content just revisiting the original material. But for some reason when the library got our first copy in for circulation and I was holding it in my hands, I just had to have it. My mom bought me a copy (as is tradition) and I read it all immediately in one sitting. I know there is a lot of hate going around for Cursed Child right now. I’ve seen people refer to it as fanfiction. Honestly, I sort of agree, but it is really really really good fanfiction. It wasn’t written by J.K. Rowling, but it was written by an accomplished playwright who did wonders with a new storyline. Seriously, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany do a great job capturing character with only dialogue. I was beyond impressed.

The story is definitely fast-paced and at times a little confusing, but we’ve got to remember that it isn’t a book, it’s a play. You can’t expect the same level of detail that the rest of the series supplies. Only super nerds like myself would go see an 8 hour Harry Potter play.  What I’m saying with all this is that if you’re fan of the characters, the story, the message—you’ve gotta read Cursed Child. Love it, hate it, you feel how you want but you’ve just got to have this story in your brain. I don’t want to spoil anything so I won’t get into to specifics but TIME TURNERS. Guys, we get more details about time turners and MCGONAGALL. She’s back and just as awesome as before. Read it for her. Cursed Child got me back in the Harry Potter spirit and now I’ve got to see Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them in November. Thanks J.K. Rowling for another great story.

Check the PPLC Catalog for Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.


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Fevre Dream, by George R.R. Martin

fevre dream martinGeorge R.R. Martin has arguably reached legendary author status with his epic fantasy series, A Song of Ice and Fire, which was turned into the equally epic TV show, Game of Thrones. But it’s easy to forget that Martin had been writing for decades before ASoIaF. One of his earliest novels is Fevre Dream, a historical/horror novel about vampires waging a turf war on steamboats in the mid-to-late 1800s.

And, yes, it’s as good as it sounds.

Captain Abner Marsh is almost put out of the steamboat business when his dilapidated fleet is destroyed during a harsh winter. When a mysterious aristocrat named Joshua York offers Marsh a partnership—and a brand-new, state-of-the-art sidewheeler—Marsh hesitates just a little before taking York up on his offer. Marsh has high hopes that his new boat will be the fastest on the Mississippi, earning him some lasting fame as a steamboat captain. But Marsh soon learns that York’s offer has many stipulations, and the Mississippi’s darkest secrets aren’t in the water at all.

I loved this book simply because it had an interesting premise that paid off in a big way. Anne Rice fans should be all over this excellent historical novel. The plot has a lot of interesting twists, the characters come to life on the page, and the details of the golden era of Mississippi River steamboats are described so well that I bet even Mark Twain would get a kick out of it. Just be prepared to read the N-word a lot. (I told you the details of the era are solid!) This book proves that George R.R. Martin is an excellent writer, researcher, and—dare I say—historian, no matter the subject or era.

Check the PPLC Catalog for Fevre Dream.